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Itchy nose or throat or nasal congestion can be signs of allergies ... or something bigger if the problems persist.
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Itchy nose or throat or nasal congestion can be signs of allergies ... or something bigger if the problems persist.
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UC otolaryngologist Allen Seiden, MD, treats patients with smell loss at the department of otolaryngology's taste and smell center.
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Publish Date: 06/09/11
Media Contact: AHC Public Relations, (513) 558-4553
Patient Info: Screenings will be held from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 14 and Wednesday, June 15, at UC Health Physicians offices in Clifton and West Chester..To make an appointment with a UC Health allergy specialist, call (513) 475-8400.
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UC HEALTH LINE: Free Allergy Screenings June 14-15

CINCINNATI—For some allergy sufferers, the runny nose, teary eyes and exhaustion hit them without warning or clear exposure to pollen or other outdoor triggers.

Knowing what specifically triggered the reaction can help allergy suffers learn how to better control their symptoms. To help patients get a clear diagnosis, UC Health otolaryngologists will offer free allergy screenings from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 14 and Wednesday, June 15, at the UC Health Physicians offices in Clifton and West Chester.

"Most people with allergies will experience sensitivity to a variety of triggers,” says Allen Seiden, MD, UC Health otolaryngologist and allergy specialist. "But typically they’ll have a strong reaction to at least one of the most common allergens, namely dust mites, mold, grass, maple tree, ragweed and cat.”

Screenings are done by skin prick testing, in which a very small amount of the allergen is put into an indentation in the skin of the forearm. If a patient is sensitive to a specific allergen, he or she will experience a small amount of temporary swelling in that area.

Then, an allergy specialist can work with the patient to determine the best way to reduce and treat their symptoms. Treatment can include antihistamines, decongestants, prescription nasal corticosteroids and/or immunotherapy (allergy shots), all depending on the nature and severity of the allergic reaction.

In addition, Seiden recommends simple steps to take at home and outside to avoid additional exposure to triggers. They include:
  • Avoid the outdoors between 5 and 10 a.m., the peak hours for pollen dispersal. 
  • If you’ve been outside, shower immediately after getting indoors and before going to bed. This helps removes pollen from skin and hair.
  • Wash clothing worn outdoors and bedding in hot water. Do not dry them outdoors.
  • Cover mattresses, box springs and pillows in a plastic barrier cloth.
  • Keep the windows and doors of your home and car closed. Use an air conditioner to cool the air, not window or attic fans.
"Nasal irrigation can also help by washing away mucus, allergy-creating particles and irritants and bacteria,” he says. "There are several nasal rinse products available. Talk with your ear, nose and throat specialist to find out the best option for you.”


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