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The green in this diagram shows bone marrow stem cells that have been injected into the eye and have taken on the properties of corneal cells. After being injected, the stem cells begin expressing cornea-specific proteins. This technology could one day help cure genetic eye diseases.
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The green in this diagram shows bone marrow stem cells that have been injected into the eye and have taken on the properties of corneal cells. After being injected, the stem cells begin expressing cornea-specific proteins. This technology could one day help cure genetic eye diseases.
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Winston Whei-Yang Kao, PhD, department of ophthalmology
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Hongshan Liu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of research in the department of ophthalmology
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Publish Date: 08/30/11
Media Contact: Katie Pence, 513-558-4561
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Ophthalmology Department Receives $100,000 for Research Initiatives

The UC department of ophthalmology has been awarded a $100,000 grant from Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB) to support ongoing and new clinical and laboratory research.

RPB is a voluntary health organization that supports eye research directed at the prevention, treatment and eradication of vision-threatening diseases. To date, the organization has awarded grants totaling $1,486,750 to UC's College of Medicine.

James Augsburger, MD, chair of the department of ophthalmology, says the grant will assist research looking at corneal wound healing, corneal stem cell transplantation, age-related macular degeneration, intraocular tumors, and retinal development disorders.

"RPB-sponsored research in these areas has resulted in innovative new approaches to treatment of corneal diseases that have improved patient visual outcomes substantially in recent years," he says.

For more information, visit www.rpbusa.org.


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