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UC College of Medicine's 2006 Honors Day celebration.
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UC College of Medicine's 2006 Honors Day celebration.
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Upon completion of a residency program, physicians can take board examinations and practice independently.
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College of Medicine Dean and Vice President for Health Affairs David Stern, MD
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Publish Date: 05/25/06
Media Contact: AHC Public Relations, (513) 558-4553
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One-Third of UC's Graduating Medical Students Staying in Cincinnati

The region will get another health-care boost this weekend when the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine holds its annual graduation ceremony.

 

Of the 150 graduating medical students, nearly one-third will stay in Cincinnati for residency training. An additional 27 graduates will complete training at other Ohio hospitals, with the rest heading out of state.

 

”Medical school graduation is quite an achievement and we are proud of all our students for their accomplishments,” said David Stern, MD, College of Medicine dean. “We are especially proud to see these young physicians move on to outstanding residency programs both locally and across the country.”

 

The graduation ceremony—called Honors Day—will begin at 1 p.m., Sunday, May 28, at the Aronoff Center for the Arts. Presenting the Honors Day address will be James Gavin III, MD, PhD, clinical professor of medicine and senior advisor on health affairs at Emory University in Atlanta.

 

Opening remarks by Dr. Stern and Jane Henney, MD, UC’s senior vice president and provost for health affairs, will be followed by recognition of the recipients of the College of Medicine’s highest honor—the Daniel Drake Medals. Numerous other awards for humanism in medicine and teaching excellence will also be presented.

 

Receiving the 2006 Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Awards presented by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation are Bruce Gebhardt, MD, associate professor, department of family medicine, and Matthew Meier, a fourth-year medical student from Dayton.

 

Gold and Silver Apple teaching awards will go to Richard Stevenson, MD, associate professor, department of surgery, and LeAnn Coberly, MD, associate professor, department of internal medicine.

 

Facts about Residency Training

 

Residency is a specialized education and training period following graduation from medical school. Upon completion of a residency program, physicians can take board examinations and practice independently.  

 

Residency training ranges from three years for programs like internal medicine, family medicine and pediatrics, to four years for obstetrics and gynecology, and five years for general surgery and many surgical subspecialties. Neurosurgery residency can take seven years to complete.  

 



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