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University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center
Publish Date: 05/26/98
Media Contact: AHC Public Relations, (513) 558-4553
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The 1998 Drake Award Winners

Cincinnati--Frederic N. Silverman, MD, and Leo E. Hollister, MD, have been selected as the 1998 recipients of the annual Daniel Drake Awards. This is the 13th annual presentation of the Drake Award. The awards, commemorating the founder of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, will be presented during the UC College of Medicine Honors Day program, Saturday, May 30 at the Taft Theatre, Downtown, Cincinnati. Ceremonies will begin at 1:30 p.m. Recipients of Drake Medals are distinguished, living UC College of Medicine faculty members or alumni who’ve made unique or outstanding contributions to medical education, research, or scholarship. The award is the highest honor given by the College of Medicine.

Silverman, a professor-emeritus of radiology and pediatrics at Stanford University, received his BA degree in 1935 and his MD degree in 1939, both from Syracuse University. He was an intern at Johns Hopkins and at Yale and was awarded the L. Emmett Holt Fellowship in Pediatric Pathology at Babies Hospital in Columbia University, New York. He resigned to join the U.S. Army in 1941.

"My good fortune was to be in undergraduate and medical school during the Depression and the beginning of recovery, followed by internships and a fellowship, and subsequent service in station and portable surgical hospitals in the Southwest Pacific Theater," Silverman says. "The experiences that resulted taught me that much can be done with little if you are willing to work for it. If you get enjoyment from your work, and can stimulate others to follow the same course, they too can achieve satisfaction while extending the compass of the work."

Silverman has been involved in pediatric diagnostic radiology, elucidation of skeletal dysplasias, and has published reports on child abuse, metabolic disorders, and radiologic hazards. He has contributed to several books, including the 5th through 9th editions of Pediatric X-ray Diagnosis. He has been honored several times, receiving the Medal of Centre Antoine Beclere, Paris, The Gold Medal of the Society for Pediatric Radiology, and The Gold Medal of the Association of University Radiologists, among others.

Hollister, a native Cincinnatian, is professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at the University of Texas, Houston, and is professor-emeritus of medicine, psychiatry, and pharmacology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Hollister received his MD degree from the University of Cincinnati in 1943 and obtained his postgraduate training from Boston City Hospital, the Veterans Administration Hospital in San Francisco, and Cincinnati General Hospital. He was board-certified in Internal Medicine in 1951 and recertified in 1974.

In the early 1950s while working as an intern at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Menlo Park, California, he began a series of clinical investigations of new drugs that revolutionized psychiatric practice. He introduced new techniques called double-blind controlled evaluations to test the new drugs. Hollister has been nationally recognized for his studies of nearly every class of drug used in psychiatry and has been awarded for his research into drug abuse.

He has been a member of many professional groups, serving as president of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and the International College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Furthermore, he is an honorary distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Foundation.

Hollister says, "We should try to pass on the knowledge that we have gained to those who follow in our profession, so that the miracles of medicine observed during our lifetimes, will continue to grow. And lastly, we should remain humble, aware of the vast amount that we don't know which needs still to be learned."


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