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The StarLux system can be used for hair reduction. This is accomplished though concentrated pulses of light that create heat in the hair follicle.
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The StarLux system can be used for hair reduction. This is accomplished though concentrated pulses of light that create heat in the hair follicle.
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John Kitzmiller, MD, chief of plastic, reconstructive and hand surgery at UC.
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Publish Date: 08/30/07
Media Contact: AHC Public Relations, (513) 558-4553
Patient Info: For appointments at Cosmetic Surgery at University Pointe, call (513) 475-8881. To register for Night of Beauty, call (513) 475-8886.
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'Pulsed Light' System Offers Safe Treatment for Common Skin Problems

CincinnatiPatients who want to eliminate unsightly hair, broken blood vessels or signs of sun damage can now do so with one medically based skin treatment system.

 

Known as StarLux, this pulsed light system uses specialized handpieces to deliver targeted wavelengths of light effective for treating specific layers of skin.

 

“Pulsed light systems are similar to lasers, but they use a much larger reflective lens,” explains Cathy Fricke, clinical skin care specialist with the University of Cincinnati’s (UC) surgery department. “This allows the light to spread over a larger area of skin, resulting in faster treatment of a more expansive area.”

 

During treatment, filtered light is directed at the target skin area and given in a smooth pulse, versus a series of more powerful energy spikes associated with lasers and other treatment systems.

 

The system incorporates a photon-recycling process that uses mirrors within the individual handpieces to recapture scattered energy. The mirrors then send the energy back to the target area, increasing treatment effectiveness.

 

Hair reduction is accomplished through concentrated pulses of light that create heat in the hair follicle. The heat loosens the hair and disables the cells responsible for new growth.

 

For pigment-related issues such as visible veins and sun spots, pulsed light is absorbed and converted to heat by blood in the veins or pigment cells in the skin. This shrinks the vessels and dissolves the cells responsible for abnormal pigmentation.

 

“This is a proven way of improving or eliminating common patient concerns such as prominent capillaries, hemangiomas, undesirable hair growth and benign brown age spots,” says John Kitzmiller, MD, assistant professor and director of plastic, reconstructive and hand surgery at UC. “Patients experience only minor discomfort during treatment—it feels like a series of little rubber band snaps—and recovery time is minimal.”

 

Most patients experience a mild sunburn-like sensation that lasts about a day, but the treatment area must be protected from the sun for about four weeks.

 

UC physicians are currently using the system to treat patients for hair reduction, sun damage, minor capillaries, hemangiomas and rosacea.

 

On Thursday, Sept. 13, people can learn more about clinical skin care options by attending “Night of Beauty,” a free informational open house. The event takes place from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Cosmetic Surgery at University Pointe, 7700 University Court, West Chester.

 

Attendees can speak one-on-one with the UC team of board-certified cosmetic surgeons and learn more about cosmetic procedures, including clinical skin care, breast enhancement, face-lifts, body contouring and other procedures.

 

Registration is required and can be made by calling (513) 475-8886. For more information about services available at the Cosmetic Surgery at University Pointe facility, visit www.cosmeticsurgeryuc.com.

 

For general information on cosmetic surgery procedures, visit www.netwellness.org, a collaborative health-information Web site staffed by Ohio physicians, nurses and allied health professionals.

 



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