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The Colossal Colon, pictured here at an event in Chesapeake, Va., is a 40-foot replica of the human colon.
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The Colossal Colon, pictured here at an event in Chesapeake, Va., is a 40-foot replica of the human colon.
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The Colossal Colon is used to educate people about colorectal cancer.
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Colossal Colon
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Chief, Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery
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Bradley Davis, MD, is a colorectal surgeon and assistant professor of surgery at UC.
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Publish Date: 03/06/08
Media Contact: AHC Public Relations, (513) 558-4553
Patient Info: For traditional colonoscopies, call (513) 475-7505. For virtual colonoscopies, call (513) 475-8755. To schedule an appointment with a colorectal surgeon, call (513) 929-0104.
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UC HEALTH LINE: 'Colossal Colon' Provides an Up-Close and Personal Understanding of Uncomfortable Topic

CINCINNATI It’s big. It’s filled with polyps. And it’s coming to Cincinnati to encourage local residents to get screened for colorectal cancer.

 

Known as Coco the Colossal Colon, this wacky 40-foot replica of the human colon was created by cancer survivor Molly McMaster after she was diagnosed and treated for colorectal cancer at age 23. Standing 4 feet tall, the jumbo crawl-through educational display includes examples of healthy colon tissue, several non-cancerous diseases of the colon, polyps (precancerous masses) and various stages of colorectal cancer. 

 

University of Cincinnati (UC) colorectal surgeon Janice Rafferty, MD, says the gigantic colon replica—which will be on display in Cincinnati this month—reinforces the fact that colorectal cancer screening saves lives.

                    

“This project is a great way to educate as many people as possible—as early as possible—about colorectal cancer in an interesting, out-of-the-box way,” says Janice Rafferty, MD, associate professor and chief of colorectal surgery at UC.

 

“We’re passionate about early cancer detection. When the disease is caught early, surgery is more likely to be curative so we encourage people to get screened by a gastrointestinal specialist,” she adds. “We hope this larger-than-life display encourages people to have ‘colon’ talk with their loved ones, recognize their own personal risk for the disease and get screened when it’s appropriate.”

 

Rafferty says most people resist getting the simple screening test—known as colonoscopy—even though colorectal cancer kills almost 50,000 Americans each year.

 

“The Colossal Colon infuses a bit of humor into the topic and makes it easier for everyone to talk about,” says Rafferty, who sees patients at Christ Hospital. “Giving people information about how and why people should have colonoscopies takes away the mystery and fear.”


Colonoscopy is
a screening exam that allows physicians to directly inspect the entire colon for potentially cancerous growths. Prior to both traditional and virtual colonoscopy, patients are required to follow a liquid-only diet for 24 to 48 hours and take laxatives to cleanse the colon and rectum. The colon is then inflated with carbon dioxide as a contrast material to improve the visual field. 

 

During a traditional colonoscopy, the patient is sedated and the physician uses a fiber-optic scope equipped with a camera to inspect the entire colon for potentially cancerous growths. In contrast, the virtual exam requires no sedation and uses a series of rapidly acquired CT scans to diagnose any problems. The virtual procedure takes about 20 minutes and the patient can immediately resume normal activities. The traditional procedure takes about an hour, plus recovery time from sedation.


The Colossal Colon will be on display as part of a health fair from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on March 15 and 16. The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place at TriHealth Health & Fitness Pavilion, 6200 Pfeiffer Rd. 

 

In addition to self-guided tours through the Colossal Colon and free educational materials, the health fair will feature local doctors’ presentations on healthy lifestyles, cancer prevention and early detection and advanced treatments for colorectal cancer.  Bradley Davis, MD, a UC colorectal surgeon, will talk about modern surgery for colorectal disease on Sunday, March 16, at 10 a.m.

 

“These types of events are critical to spread the message that colorectal cancer is preventable and very treatable,” says Davis, assistant professor of surgery at UC and cochair of the Hamilton County American Cancer Society (ACS) colorectal cancer taskforce. “Coco the Colon is such a spectacle that it serves as a great reminder—as well as a starting point—to begin a dialogue about a subject that many find embarrassing.”

 

According to the ACS, 90 percent of all early-stage colorectal cancers are curable, and about 75 percent of Americans who get the disease are over 50. The organization estimates that more than 150,000 people are diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer annually.

 

For traditional colonoscopies, call (513) 475-7505. For virtual colonoscopies, call (513) 475-8755. To schedule an appointment with a colorectal surgeon, call (513) 929-0104.

 

For more information on vascular health, visit www.netwellness.org, a collaborative health-information Web site staffed by Ohio physicians, nurses and allied health professionals.



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