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Michael Privitera, MD, is a professor in the neurology department and director of the Epilepsy Center at the UC Neuroscience Institute.
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Michael Privitera, MD, is a professor in the neurology department and director of the Epilepsy Center at the UC Neuroscience Institute.
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Publish Date: 10/19/09
Media Contact: AHC Public Relations, (513) 558-4553
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Epilepsy Center Fund-Raiser Offers Food, Wines and Fun

CINCINNATI—If you’re looking to combine an evening of fun with raising funds for a worthy cause, “Celebrating Research Innovations for an Epilepsy Cure” is the perfect opportunity.

The third annual event, a benefit for the Epilepsy Center at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Neuroscience Institute, is set for 6-9 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 1, at Embers Restaurant on Montgomery Road. Co-chairs are Jon Zipperstein, Susan Muth and Michael Privitera, MD. Hosts are Pamela and Charles Shor.

The evening will feature guest bartenders, food by the bite and a silent auction and raffle of fine wines, sports items and a vacation condo. In addition to free wine tastings, the event will showcase a “sommelier’s tasting room” with wines available by the glass. Matthew Citriglia, a Level IV master sommelier, will be on hand to answer guests’ questions about wine.

“We’ll have something for everyone, from high-end to affordable wines,” says Muth, founder and president of Strategic Business Solutions, Inc. “In addition, in our silent auction we have a variety of items from plasma TV to jewelry to a home in Snowmass. We are so grateful for our sponsors and donors in this challenging economy.”

A special guest for the fundraiser will be Susan Axelrod, president and founding member of Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy (CURE). Axelrod, whose oldest child, Lauren, began having uncontrollable seizures at 7 months of age, has made numerous television appearances and wrote a personal essay on her family’s experience with epilepsy for Newsweek magazine. Her husband, David Axelrod, is a senior adviser to President Barack Obama.

Funds raised by the event will help further research in such areas as new anti-epileptic drugs, brain imaging, life and mood issues related to epilepsy, the effectiveness of generic drugs for epilepsy patients and the interaction between stress and epileptic seizures.

“The funding environment now is challenging and has been very difficult for the past five to seven years in terms of federal funding for research,” says Privitera, director of the Epilepsy Center and a professor of neurology at the UC College of Medicine. “That’s particularly true for epilepsy research, where there are a large number of people affected and only a modest amount of money for research.”

Tickets for the fundraiser are $50 per person. For reservations and information, contact Jennifer Dilbert of the UC Foundation at (513) 558-6903 or Jennifer.Dilbert@uc.edu.

The event’s Five Star Presenting Level sponsors are Pamela and Charles Shor and Fifth Third Bank. Embers restaurant, owned by Zipperstein, is donating the use of the entire restaurant and all of the food.

The Epilepsy Center, identified as a center of excellence by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers, cares for more epilepsy patients than any other center in the region and includes the region’s only Level IV epilepsy monitoring unit. The comprehensive program includes detailed evaluation, coordinated medical and surgical treatment and clinical trials that make the newest therapies available to patients. It is known internationally for its role in developing new seizure medications and its work in brain imaging.

The UC Neuroscience Institute is dedicated to patient care, research, education and the development of new treatments for stroke, brain and spinal tumors, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain and spinal injury, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, disorders of the nerves and muscles, disorders of the senses  (swallowing, voice, hearing, pain, taste and smell) and psychiatric conditions (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and depression).



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